Committee on Library

Annual Report 1998-1999

Academic Senate
Committee on Library
Guenter Risse, Chair


The Committee on Library met four times during the academic year and addressed issues in several areas: Mission Bay, California Digital Library, programs, policies, collection issues, fiscal budget, and committee issues.

I. UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN SEARCH
Karen Butter continued to serve as Acting University Librarian. The Search Committee, chaired by Cliff Attkisson, interviewed candidates throughout the year, but did not appoint a new Librarian. The search has been extended through 1999-2000.

II. LIBRARY BUDGET AND OPERATIONS
The legislature funded one-time increases for all UC library collections based on student FTE’s. However, the UCSF Library did not receive the full funding, $223,000, provided by the state legislature. A letter was sent to the Chancellor’s Office, with a copy to Vice Chancellor Steve Barclay and Bob Obana regarding this issue. According to Vice Chancellor Barclay, $119,000 from the $223,000 allocated was already received in the Library’s budget request, submitted in April 1998. Furthermore, the remaining balance of the one-time funds, $103,000, will be allocated as part of the budget request for this year.

Concerns were raised that the library is not receiving sufficient funding, and that one-time funding should be used for acquiring books rather than for covering shortfalls in journal expenditures. There is also concern that UCSF supports several academic programs, and that these budgetary issues will continue with the increased specialization and interdisciplinary nature of the health sciences and the introduction of new programs. Chair Guenter Risse proposed meeting with the Chancellor to discuss this issue further, stressing the importance of voicing faculty and student concerns; next year’s Library Committee will look into scheduling a meeting.

III. UCSF/STANFORD HEALTH CARE (USHC)
Ms. Butter had meetings with Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs Dorothy Bainton and Bruce Schroffel, Chief Operating Officer, UCSF Stanford Health Care, to discuss funding for the library from USHC. Suzanne Henry, past Chair of the Library Committee, joined the discussions. USHC acknowledged that the clinical enterprise should support the library, as Stanford’s Lane Medical Library currently receives 25% of the budget. This raised the issue of how to allocate funding for faculty who are doing clinical care as well as academic research. In addition, with increased usage of the Internet, it is more difficult to discern between those faculty who are doing clinical care and those who are doing academic research.

IV. CALIFORNIA DIGITAL LIBRARY (CDL)
CDL continues to negotiate licensing agreements with publishers. Of concern to the library is the issue of these licensing terms. Some of the licenses are "free" if the library already has a paper subscription. Also, some licenses are limited by one geographic city, which creates a problem for faculty in Fresno. Ms. Butter has been working through the licenses to either change the wording or renegotiate; consequently, faculty may not have access to the same journals this year as last year due to new terms. Ms. Butter acknowledged that these journals are critical to faculty, however it is equally important to insure that licensing terms are acceptable.

V. MISSION BAY LIBRARY PLANS
In preliminary discussions regarding the library facility at Mission Bay, the Library Committee reviewed issues such as current services and customer base on the Parnassus campus; expected services and customer base at Mission Bay; and both short and long-term assumptions regarding the planning and operation of the new library. Two possibilities that may provide options in planning a more permanent library are potential synergies between the library, the proposed San Francisco Unified School District and the neighborhood, as well as the relationship with small biotechnology companies located at Mission Bay.

Ms. Butter presented plans for the new library at Mission Bay (to be housed in Building 24). The library will be on the 2nd floor, adjacent to the food center, and about 1800 sq. ft. is available. Discussions are currently being held regarding the library needs, such as providing a transfer service for Inter-library loans between UCSF and Mission Bay. Ms. Butter stated that her planning assumes that most of the materials needed by faculty and graduate students will be available electronically, and that there will not be a large paper collection of journals or books. There is the possibility of 8-10,000 sq. ft. of library space in the community center, but this remains to be confirmed. Thus, it is important to hold onto the library space in Building 24.

VI. REPORT ON UCOL
Jorge Oksenberg reported on several issues from UCOL meetings. One issue of concern was a proposal to fold UCOL into a broader council, or under the umbrella of an infrastructure committee. This is a crucial time for the UC libraries, and faculty attention must be focused on the highly specialized concerns of the libraries. The consensus of UCOL members was that the library should remain as its own committee and continue to address specific library issues. A letter was sent to the Academic Council proposing that the library committees remain independent.

UCOL discussed supporting the demands of Librarians in areas such as salaries and steps, and stressed the importance of supporting the human aspect as well as the library infrastructure. There was also a discussion of the concept of "one campus, one university, one library" which includes a new way for people to request library materials through a new feature called ‘Request.’ In this preliminary stage, only graduate students and faculty can use the new Interlibrary loan procedures; once the program is running smoothly, all students will be able to use it and it will expand to include journal articles.

Other issues discussed by UCOL include new ways of scholarly communication and one-time moneys. UCSF and UC Riverside were the only two libraries that did not receive their one-time funding appropriated by the legislature for UC library collections.

Copies of these letters were distributed to Committee members. In addition, Dr. Oksenberg reviewed a letter from Academic Council Chair Aimée Dorr asking UCOL to work with libraries to ensure that the UC libraries retain at least one paper copy of any given journal, and that all campuses have access to items in the California Digital Library’s collection.

VII. SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION: UCSF EDITOR’S FORUM
A systemwide committee is currently looking at new ways for scholarly communication. One project arising out of the committee is an Editor’s Forum, whereby UCSF Editors from selected journals would be identified to discuss the issue of scholarly communication. Critical issues around scholarly communication include economic issues, copyright, quality versus quantity and peer review, alternative models for scholarly communication and publishing, and specific strategies of action for the University of California.

The Library Committee supported the proposal to hold an editor’s forum. Ms. Butter distributed a draft of the letter to be sent to all UCSF faculty, asking them to self-identify as editors or associate editors of scholarly journals. It was noted that the letter should emphasize the additional need for faculty who serve in editorial positions for journals that are published only electronically. The letter was sent to faculty in June, in order to begin preparing for an Editor’s Forum in the Fall.

VIII. DEVELOPMENT ON THE E-PRINT IDEA
Ms. Butter distributed a proposal for "E-BIOMED: A proposal for Electronic Publications in the Biomedical Sciences," and stated that NIH is asking for comments from individuals and societies. In addition, Richard Lucier, CDL Librarian, is working with the Office of the President on a similar proposal, whereby articles from societies or submissions could eventually be placed online, thus allowing a freer exchange of ideas.

The Committee discussed the potential impact of this proposal on the publishing culture. One comment was that this could have a big impact on how people use ideas and take credit for ideas not filtered through more formal channels, such as peer review. There was also concern that this could cause a decline in the publication of academic monographs but could also result in a decline in the cost of journal subscriptions. This could also have a big implication for societies who depend on subscription income for their activities.

IX. DEMONSTRATIONS: ON-LINE SERVICES

Web of Science
Peggy Tahir gave a demonstration of a new on-line database from the Institute for Scientific Information, called The Web of Science. It combines three indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, and Arts & Humanities Citation Index.

Request
Jacqueline Wilson, Manager of Information Public Services, demonstrated "Request," a new system designed to facilitate Interlibrary loan requests through the Melvyl catalogue. Request is available primarily for books and some other media listed in the catalogue. The next phase will support requests for journal articles.

The Online Archive of California
Robin Chandler, Manager of Archives and Special Collections, gave a demonstration of The Online Archive of California (OAC), a central database of encoded archival Finding Aids, a project managed by the California Digital Library. The Finding Aids, or detailed indexes to departmental, organizational or individual papers and records, are the first steps in worldwide access to these unique collections. Initial funding is available now to digitize selected archival collections across all UC campuses. Two common themes extending across all campus collections have been identified: ethnic groups and art movements. UCSF will contribute some of its collections for digitization.

X. INFORMATICS EDUCATION & TRAINING PROGRAM
David King, Special Assistant for Informatics Education, presented on Informatics and Information Management Education Programs. Some of the programs offered include:

  • Informatics Training Seminars Program
  • Curriculum-based Educational Program
  • Technology in Education Faculty Seminars
  • Professional and Staff Continuing Education
  • Personal Information Management Consulting
  • Electronic Information and Education Services

Gail Persily, Manager of Instructional Media Services, spoke on the integration of the web in the curriculum. "CHOMP" – or Course Home Page – is a tool that was developed at the UCSF Library and Center for Knowledge Management and allows faculty to develop course web pages and online discussion forums.

XI. HISTORY OF UCSF WEB SITE
Ms. Chandler gave a presentation on the UCSF History website. This website, which was endorsed by last year’s Library Committee and funded by Vice Chancellor Dorothy Bainton, will serve as a tool to inform the public, faculty, staff, and students about UCSF. It is meant to provide only a brief history, and will include approximately 75 HTML pages with narrative text and 200-250 digital images to illustrate the text. Currently, the website is in the design process, and the draft for Part I (including the first two chapters) has been completed. The Library is hoping to release the website this summer. Release is waiting for completion of the writing and editing for Parts II and III.

XII. LIBRARY POLICIES
Ms. Butter reported on a standing policy in the Library that asks patrons to be considerate of others. Currently, issues regarding the usage of cellular phones have been raised, due to some recent disturbances. Ms. Butter reaffirmed that while cellular phones will be permitted, callers will be encouraged to use their phones either outside or in designated phone areas (e.g. by public phones). In addition, no electronic devices whatsoever are allowed on the fourth floor. The Library Committee endorsed the existing policy and actions regarding cellular phones.

XIII. SUBCOMMITTEE ON HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS
Dr. Risse distributed a statement from Nancy Rockafellar, Subcommittee on Historical Collections. The statement asserts that the library’s historical collections are a major asset for the campus. The subcommittee suggested the permanent implementation of a policy for the evaluation of de-accessioned books, which would be overseen by the Library Committee and include a Faculty Collections Advisory Committee (consisting of faculty volunteers to be rotated each year). It was generally agreed that it is important to maintain in the Library a sense of historical perspective, and that the proposal should be narrowed down to major areas of concern. This issue will continue to be discussed by next year’s Library Committee.


Respectfully,

Committee on Library

Guenter Risse, Chair
Christoph Schreiner, Vice Chair
Patricia Benner
Christopher Cullander
Anthony DeFranco
Tim Hamill
Jorge Oksenberg
Octavia Plesh
Karen Butter, ex-officio
Julia Kochi, ex-officio
Alice Wong, GSA rep


Academic Senate Committee on Library
Attendance 1998- 1999
10/30
1/25
4/12
5/27
G. Risse, Chair
X
X
X
X
C. Schreiner, Vice Chair
X
A
X
X
P. Benner
A
X
A
X
C. Cullander
X
A
X
A
A. DeFranco
X
A
X
X
T. Hamill, non-AS observer
A
A
A
A
J. Oksenberg
X
X
X
X
O. Plesh
X
X
X
X
K. Butter, ex officio
X
X
X
X
J. Kochi, ex officio
A
X
X
X
A. Wong, GSA Rep.
n/a
X
A
A
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